My Ancestral heritage
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My Ancestral heritage
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My ancestors came from Poland and what is now Lithuania in the part of the twentieth century, thus much of the food that I was brought up with came from that tradion. The history of Poland and its
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My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/26/2009 7:40 AM EDT
Posts: 6
First: 10/26/2009
Last: 11/6/2009
My ancestors came from Poland and what is now Lithuania in the part of the twentieth century, thus much of the food that I was brought up with came from that tradion.
The history of Poland and its culture is a varied one. Intermarriage with other royalty, conquest, partitions and other political issues had a lasting effect on Polish cuisine. Another cultural influence came from the dictatates of the Roman Catholic church. The religious tradions, until recent times, includes fasts, primarily those of Advent and Lent, so of necessity fish and meatless dishes had to created.
With the extensive game and fish available, and a burgeoning dairy industry, the Polish housewife had game, fish and the cheeses, milk and sour cream that is in many of their dishes.The kitchen garden each family had provided vegetables and herbs, particularly the root vegetables and members of the cabbage family.
My mother's parents had been born into poverty in what was occupied Poland, thus their diet would have been based on the food available to them. Meat and even fish would have been scarce, with much of their diet based on grains and vegetables.
MY mother, Katherine Wierzbick Pliskowski, was born into this tradition, one of welcome and sharing, in September '06. The traditional Polish greetin, when translated, means "Guest in the house, God in the house". Anytime I have entered a Polish household, particularly that of Jane Gwiazdowski{my Brother's mother-in-law, the feeling of welcome and warmth are overwhelming.
Financially life was not much better for many of these immigrants who came to the shores of America, although there was a huge difference from whence they came and this glorious place we now call Home. One word describes it well, Hope, but additionally they had freedom. Every single one of them understood that by the sweat of their brows they could "Be something" and if they could not as an individual rise above their status, then they could dream this for their children.
The food that my grandmother made and served continued in the peasant tradion of her native land. Poverty had followed her to these shores, so luxuries,such as meat, dairy products, and sugar was scarce in her kitchen. She was illiterate, thus her recipes were committed to memory. She learned them after having cooked them over and over. Food was important to these immigrants, much more for sustenance than its preparation or presentation.
My mother talked fondly about a special breakfast that my grandmother occasionally fixed for her. Very infrequently, I am told, but does that not what makes it special? It was a thin pancake, much like a crepe,that was filled with a pot cheese or farmer's cheese filling that had been slightly sweetened and then browned.

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/26/2009 9:24 AM EDT
Posts: 478
First: 8/20/2008
Last: 2/15/2011
Great memories you've shared and extremely interesting! Thanks for sharing!

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/26/2009 9:56 AM EDT
Posts: 34
First: 9/9/2008
Last: 10/1/2010
Thank you for taking the time to write this lovely story! My anscestors came from Poland and my husband's from Lithuania. I know the wonderful foods and feelings of which you speak. God Bless!

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/26/2009 2:54 PM EDT
Posts: 3
First: 10/19/2009
Last: 2/18/2010
I hear pride in your story! My own Father came here to USA from Czechoslavakia. He too brought etnic food recipes that I grew up with and still love the best! He came to Ellis Island and ended up in Western Pa coal mines! Had 19 children and died with Black Lung but never was sad he came to be an American. He taught us to work hard, never to touch what does not belong to you, and to thank God ! I was making bread at 9 yrs old . Thank You for bringing back memories of the old country and how poor we were in money but rich in pride of how heritage!

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/27/2009 1:04 AM EDT
Posts: 689
First: 8/11/2008
Last: 10/17/2010
great

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/27/2009 2:10 AM EDT
Posts: 42
First: 10/27/2009
Last: 10/19/2010
I too came from a Polish immigrant household. I vividly remember babaka baking for Easter, Poppy seed Cake for Christmas Eve. Pleasures where simple and from the heart. Church was the center of every holiday. Easter we brought all our eggs, bread, Ham (and even our chocolate bunnies) to be blessed on holy Saturday. Christmas eve was the midnight mass.

Poland was wiped off the map numerous times during the 1700's. However, The Polish people kept the culture and language alive even though it could of cost them there lives. A true testament of the tremendous spirit and pride of the Polish people.

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/27/2009 2:49 AM EDT
Posts: 245
First: 10/13/2008
Last: 4/9/2010
Family heritage is so important to all. Maybe not when we are younger, but, it gives us a sense of who we are and why certain things become so much a part of us. Thanx...

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/27/2009 3:24 AM EDT
Posts: 19
First: 9/4/2008
Last: 2/9/2010
Thank you so much to share with us your wonderful story, my fsmily to came here from germany bringing many recipes in there mind and sharing with all there children and then i have married a immigrant from the middle east an have also learned a whole new culture of foods and tradition.making life full an pleasant without the need for money we are rich in love an family.May god bless you!

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/27/2009 3:33 AM EDT
Posts: 113
First: 8/7/2008
Last: 11/2/2009
I like...think -you for sharing

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/27/2009 7:54 AM EDT
J R
Posts: 86
First: 8/8/2008
Last: 10/16/2011
Thank You for sharing such a beautiful memory.

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/27/2009 8:36 AM EDT
Posts: 120
First: 2/22/2009
Last: 12/20/2010
I came from a Lithuanian background. Very cool to see other lovely Lithuanians on the boards.
We had several people in the relative/friend list who did the great Polish cooking. Just yummy stuff.

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/27/2009 12:27 PM EDT
Posts: 6
First: 10/27/2009
Last: 9/19/2010
Thank you for writing this story. My great-grandparents were from Poland, and one great-grandfather landed in the coal mines of Eastern PA. I hear about all of these foods from my mother.

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/27/2009 2:47 PM EDT
Posts: 58
First: 9/15/2009
Last: 2/25/2010
Wm H, I to thank you for sharing, i don't know much about my ancestors only that I am a mixture of German & French on my Fathers side and French 7 english on my Mothers side, but I don't know anything about their families or how they got here. I love hearing and learning about old ways from other countries. I also love the old recipes. We are so Blessed here in America and have so much. God bless you and yours, Granna2

My Ancestral heritage

posted at 10/31/2009 11:36 AM EDT
Posts: 6
First: 10/26/2009
Last: 11/6/2009
My thanks to all of you who have shared part of your own story with me, Find those old stories and write a book. I am using blurb.com and writing this all down. Our current generation needs to know from whence we came, our heritage and culture is really all that we can give them. It will give them a sense of family.

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