WORLD WATER DAY
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WORLD WATER DAY
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Today is World Water Day. Do you know what that means?
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WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/22/2013 7:24 AM EDT
Posts: 3925
First: 9/5/2010
Last: 4/18/2014
Today is World Water Day. Do you know what that means?

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/22/2013 10:18 AM EDT
Posts: 612
First: 10/17/2012
Last: 4/9/2013
 I don't have an idea but there's a "for everything" now days. National chocolate day... too many of those days kind of days to even list. Maybe it's about conserving water?

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/22/2013 11:57 AM EDT
Posts: 959
First: 1/20/2010
Last: 4/13/2014
I don't have a clue what it means.

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/22/2013 1:12 PM EDT
Posts: 3925
First: 9/5/2010
Last: 4/18/2014

Water cooperation

The fulfilment of basic human needs, our environment, socio-economic development and poverty reduction are all heavily dependent on water. 

Good management of water is especially challenging due to some of its unique characteristics: it is unevenly distributed in time and space, the hydrological cycle is highly complex and perturbations have multiple effects. Rapid urbanization, pollution and climate change threaten the resource while demands for water are increasing in order to satisfy the needs of a growing world population, now at over seven billion people, for food production, energy, industrial and domestic uses. Water is a shared resource and its management needs to take into account a wide variety of conflicting interests. This provides opportunities for cooperation among users.

In designating 2013 as the UN International Year of Water Cooperation, the UNGA recognizes that cooperation is essential to strike a balance between the different needs and priorities and share this precious resource equitably, using water as an instrument of peace. Promoting water cooperation implies an interdisciplinary approach bringing in cultural, educational and scientific factors, as well as religious, ethical, social, political, legal, institutional and economic dimensions.

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/22/2013 1:50 PM EDT
Posts: 1333
First: 8/8/2008
Last: 4/16/2014
nver heard of it

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/22/2013 5:31 PM EDT
Posts: 2164
First: 8/8/2008
Last: 4/18/2014
never heard of it

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/22/2013 7:34 PM EDT
Posts: 1821
First: 9/9/2008
Last: 4/18/2014
Sorry Maxine, never heard of it but something tells me that, with the UN involved, one way or another it will cost our  country money we don't have.

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/23/2013 12:15 AM EDT
Posts: 3925
First: 9/5/2010
Last: 4/18/2014

"Water holds the key to sustainable development," said UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon in a video address today for World Water Day. "We must work together to protect and carefully manage this fragile finite resource."

It's the 20th anniversary of the United Nations holiday, but even after years of attempting to call attention to the severe lack of clean water in areas all over the world, millions still don't have access to clean drinking water or functional sanitation systems

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/23/2013 8:17 AM EDT
Posts: 3543
First: 1/16/2009
Last: 4/18/2014
I never heard of this day.  However, water is very important to us in all we do.  Do not waste it.

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/24/2013 7:49 AM EDT
Posts: 3925
First: 9/5/2010
Last: 4/18/2014

On World Water Day, there’s been a lot of talk about the 783 million people who lack clean water and the fact that in Africa, women and children spend about 40 billion hours a year collecting water.

The stats are heartbreaking and there are a host of organizations working to put an end to these water-related crises.

But there’s also a whole crop of H2O-oriented problems right here in the developed world that no one has yet to address on this critical awareness day. What about cash-strapped pool owners? The rain haters? And those poor dieters who struggle each and every day to stay hydrated to stave off hunger?

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/25/2013 1:04 AM EDT
Posts: 3925
First: 9/5/2010
Last: 4/18/2014

The United States is in the midst of one of the biggest droughts in recent memory. At last count, over half of the lower 48 states had abnormally dry conditions and are suffering from at least moderate drought.

More than 80% of seven states were as of last week in “severe drought,” characterized by crop or pasture loss, water shortage and water restrictions.  Depending on whether the hardest-hit regions see significant precipitation, crops yields could fall and drought conditions could persist for months to come. Based on the latest data provided by the U.S. Drought Monitor, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the seven states running out of water.

U.S. Department of Agriculture meteorologist and Drought Monitor team member, Brad Rippey, explained that when the drought began in 2012, the worst of the conditions were much farther east, in states like Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan — the corn belt states. Based on pre-drought estimates, corn used for grain lost slightly more than a quarter of its potential. By the Summer of 2012, 59% of U.S. rangeland and pastureland was rated by the USDA as being in poor or very poor condition. The growing drought decimated national hay production, causing feed shortages, which in turn drove up prices in livestock.

By the fall of 2012, drought conditions continued to expand westward to its current epicenter — states like Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado and Oklahoma. Rippey explained that most worrying is the drought’s effects on the winter wheat crop, which is one of the biggest crops grown in the U.S., and which is grown almost entirely in the states in severe drought. While the region has had some precipitation recently, “winter wheat crop will need ideal conditions heading through the next few weeks just to break even. We’re still trending towards a very poor hard red winter wheat crop at this point,” Rippey said.

In addition to severe drought conditions, relatively large areas in the worst-off states are in “exceptional” drought, which the USDA identifies as “exceptional and widespread crop/pasture losses, shortages of water in reservoirs, streams, and wells creating water emergencies.” More than 70% of Nebraska is currently classified as being in a state of “exceptional drought,” which includes Exceptional and widespread crop/pasture losses; shortages of water in reservoirs, streams, and wells creating water emergencies.

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/27/2013 6:38 PM EDT
Posts: 725
First: 12/31/2009
Last: 3/21/2014
This is the first time I've heard of it.

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/27/2013 7:37 PM EDT
Posts: 1073
First: 11/14/2008
Last: 4/7/2014

Have heard of it, but have not done much research on it............

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/28/2013 12:09 AM EDT
Posts: 3925
First: 9/5/2010
Last: 4/18/2014

Water is a precious resource.

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/28/2013 2:12 AM EDT
Posts: 612
First: 10/17/2012
Last: 4/9/2013
In Response to Re: WORLD WATER DAY:
The United States is in the midst of one of the biggest droughts in recent memory. At last count, over half of the lower 48 states had abnormally dry conditions and are suffering from at least moderate drought. More than 80% of seven states were as of last week in “severe drought,” characterized by crop or pasture loss, water shortage and water restrictions.  Depending on whether the hardest-hit regions see significant precipitation, crops yields could fall and drought conditions could persist for months to come. Based on the latest data provided by the U.S. Drought Monitor, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the seven states running out of water. U.S. Department of Agriculture meteorologist and Drought Monitor team member, Brad Rippey, explained that when the drought began in 2012, the worst of the conditions were much farther east, in states like Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan — the corn belt states. Based on pre-drought estimates, corn used for grain lost slightly more than a quarter of its potential. By the Summer of 2012, 59% of U.S. rangeland and pastureland was rated by the USDA as being in poor or very poor condition. The growing drought decimated national hay production, causing feed shortages, which in turn drove up prices in livestock. By the fall of 2012, drought conditions continued to expand westward to its current epicenter — states like Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado and Oklahoma. Rippey explained that most worrying is the drought’s effects on the winter wheat crop, which is one of the biggest crops grown in the U.S., and which is grown almost entirely in the states in severe drought. While the region has had some precipitation recently, “winter wheat crop will need ideal conditions heading through the next few weeks just to break even. We’re still trending towards a very poor hard red winter wheat crop at this point,” Rippey said. In addition to severe drought conditions, relatively large areas in the worst-off states are in “exceptional” drought, which the USDA identifies as “exceptional and widespread crop/pasture losses, shortages of water in reservoirs, streams, and wells creating water emergencies.” More than 70% of Nebraska is currently classified as being in a state of “exceptional drought,” which includes Exceptional and widespread crop/pasture losses; shortages of water in reservoirs, streams, and wells creating water emergencies.
Posted by Maxine M


 Maxine I just read the stats on the water conditions that you had here and it is pretty much what I've been hearing here in California. In Dec. they thought that maybe we would catch up but now it's not so. I listen to Wall Street News in the Morning and they said that all the crops will be getting WAY less than they ask for. Where I live our lake holds the water for a HUGE area around. Five years ago I saw the bottom of the lake. This is a really big lake normally. It's a man-made lake and at the bottom was a bunch of stuff I've never seen. Towns that left so the lake could be built and they were some of the oldest first towns. Just made me sad. We are asked not to water off our porches and such unless it really needs it. In general just be careful with the water. I live in a big area of crops. And then I think of the poor animals searching for the water that most of them were used to having freely. I'm one of those people that say yes, things are definitely changing.

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/28/2013 8:57 AM EDT
Posts: 3406
First: 10/6/2010
Last: 4/15/2014
A good start would be to not water lawns.
Yes there would be a lot of brown in the yard but grass does what it it supposed to do when it does not get water.  It goes dormant.  Once it gets water again it will come back.  
People also water lightly so the roots do not grow deep causing more stress on plants. And possible death.
I water trees first then bushes but never grass.

Re: WORLD WATER DAY

posted at 3/28/2013 12:22 PM EDT
Posts: 2164
First: 8/8/2008
Last: 4/18/2014
never heard ofg it

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