Spring Foam Pans?
True
Beginners and Advice
Spring Foam Pans?
Learn the baker basics
I am making a staggered cake with three sizes, a 10 in 9 in and 8 in. The only pans I have in these sizes are spring foam. I have had to throw 2 cakes away cause I can't find anywhere that says how mu
0
Cat:3473a929-a609-4b85-8818-bf915c7505deForum:6ccd414b-874c-4e32-8064-35710fb4af41
Cat:3473a929-a609-4b85-8818-bf915c7505deForum:6ccd414b-874c-4e32-8064-35710fb4af41Discussion:93d76213-f1f3-40c4-970c-8d4186378a60

Forums » Baking Forums » Beginners and Advice » Spring Foam Pans?

You must be logged in to contribute. Log in | Register
 
Forums  »  Baking Forums  »  Beginners and Advice  »  Spring Foam Pans?

Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/2/2014 3:49 PM EST
Posts: 6
First: 12/12/2013
Last: 1/10/2014
I am making a staggered cake with three sizes, a 10 in 9 in and 8 in. The only pans I have in these sizes are spring foam. I have had to throw 2 cakes away cause I can't find anywhere that says how much batter in each and how long to cook them for. I cooked the 8 inch for around 45 min and my knife came out clean so I thought it was done, I went to level it and when I took the top off it had a pudding like center. Any tips would be helpful.  Thank you

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/2/2014 9:37 PM EST
Posts: 3927
First: 9/5/2010
Last: 4/19/2014
Spring Foam Pans are usually/mainly for baking Cheesecake

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/3/2014 8:30 AM EST
Posts: 1856
First: 10/8/2010
Last: 2/12/2014
Rachelle, I'd use one recipe's worth of cake batter divided between the 8 and the 9 inch and another recipe for the 10 inch.  As Maxine said, the springform pans are mainly used for cheesecake, but I don't see why you couldn't use them for regular cake.

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/3/2014 9:13 AM EST
Posts: 1954
First: 12/5/2010
Last: 4/18/2014
welcome rachelle
here's a conversion chart  gale g gave us

maybe it will help some


Brownie Points Leaderboard
Rank: 2
633,285 points

CAKE PAN SIZE CONVERSIONS

 
 
Cake Pan Size Conversions
You never need to adjust the oven temperature:
cakes need to bake quickly in a relatively hot oven to set their structure and to make sure they don't dry out.
You only need to adjust the baking time.
For example, the same cake batter baked in a Bundt cake pan might take a full hour to bake, whereas cupcakes might be done after only 20 minutes.
If you’re using a smaller pan with the same volume of batter (using an 11"x8" pan instead of 13"x9"),
you're actually making a deeper cake, so it might take a little longer to bake.
I'd still start checking it after 30 minutes:
the cake should spring back when you touch the surface lightly with your finger.
If it springs back, use a toothpick to be sure it's done.
Insert a toothpick in the center of the cake and hold it there for a second before pulling it out. If a couple of crumbs stick to the toothpick, the cake is done;
if you see a wet batter, add about five more minutes to your timer before checking your cake again.
Trying to fit a square cake into a round pan? Find out how much batter you'll need.
If you have an unusual pan size and would like to figure out its capacity, measure the amount of water it takes to fill the pan.
Compare that measurement to the volumes in our chart (or the cake pan size listed in your recipe) to determine how much batter you'll need.
To ensure a cake rises evenly, you should only fill your pans to the half-way mark.
The baking time may change as well, so it is imperative that you keep a watchful eye on your cake, and check for doneness using your preferred method.
It's always better to have a little extra batter, rather than not enough. Once you've filled the pans half-full, use any remaining batter to bake a few cupcakes.

Recipe Calls For
Volume
Use Instead
1 (8-inch) round cake pan
4 cups
1 (8 x 4)-inch loaf pan, or
1 (9-inch) round cake pan, or
1 (9-inch) pie plate
2 (8-inch) round cake pans
8 cups
2 (8 x 4-inch) loaf pans
1 (9-inch) tube pan
2 (9-inch) round cake pans
1 (10-inch) Bundt pan
1 (11 x 7-inch) baking dish
1 (10-inch) springform pan
1 (9-inch) round cake pan
6 cups
1 (8-inch) round cake pan
1 (8 x 4-inch) loaf pan
1 (11 x 7-inch) baking dish
2 (9-inch) round cake pans
12 cups
2 (8 x 4-inch) loaf pans
1 (9-inch) tube pan
2 (8-inch) round cake pans
1 (10-inch) Bundt pan
2 (11 x 7-inch) baking dishes
1 (10-inch) springform pan
1 (10-inch) round cake pan
11 cups
2 (8-inch) round cake pans
1 (9-inch) tube pan
1 (10-inch) springform pan
2 (10-inch) round cake pans
22 cups
5 (8-inch) round cake pans
3 or 4 (9-inch) round cake pans
2 (10-inch) springform pans
9-inch tube pan
12 cups
2 (9-inch) round cake pans
2 (8-inch) round cake pans
1 (10-inch) Bundt pan
10-inch tube pan
16 cups
3 (9-inch) round cake pans
2 (10-inch) pie plates
2 (9-inch) deep dish pie plates
4 (8-inch) pie plates
2 (9x5-inch) loaf pans
2 (8-inch) square baking dishes
2 (9-inch) square baking dishes
10-inch Bundt pan
12 cups
1 (9x13-inch) baking dish
2 (9-inch) round cake pans
2 (8-inch) round cake pans
1 (9-inch) tube pan
2 (11x7-inch) baking dishes
1 (10-inch) springform pan
11 x 7 x 2-inch baking dish
6 cups
1 (8-inch) square baking dish
1 (9-inch) square baking dish
1 (9-inch) round cake pan
9 x 13 x 2-inch baking dish
15 cups
1 (10-inch) Bundt cake pan
2 (9-inch) round cake pans
3 (8-inch) round cake pans
1 (10 x 15-inch) jellyroll pan
10 x 15 x 1-inch jellyroll pan
15 cups
1 (10-inch) Bundt pan
2 (9-inch) round cake pans
2 (8-inch) round cake pans
1 (9 x 13-inch) baking dish
9 x 5-inch loaf pan
8 cups
1 (9 x 2-inch) deep dish pie plate
1 (10-inch) pie plate
1 (8-inch) square baking dish
1 (9-inch) square baking dish
8 x 4-inch loaf pan
6 cups
1 (8-inch) round cake pan
1 (11 x 7-inch) baking dish
9-inch springform pan
10 cups
1 (10-inch) round cake pan
1 (10-inch) springform pan
2 (8-inch) round cake pans
2 (9-inch) round cake pans
10-inch springform pan
12 cups
2 (8 x 4-inch) loaf pans
1 (9-inch) tube pan
2 (9-inch) round cake pans
1 (10-inch) Bundt pan
2 (11 x 7-inch) baking dishes
2 (8-inch) round cake pans
8-inch square baking dish
8 cups
1 (9 x 2-inch) deep dish pie plate
1 (9 x 5-inch) loaf pan
2 (8-inch) pie plates
9-inch square baking dish
8 cups
1 (11 x 7-inch) baking dish
1 (9 x 2-inch) deep dish pie plate
1 (9 x 5-inch) loaf pan
2 (8-inch) pie plates

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/3/2014 7:04 PM EST
Posts: 3406
First: 10/6/2010
Last: 4/15/2014
Before you pour a regular batter into a Springform pan wrap the outside of the pan with aluminum foil.. They have a tendency to leak and you don't want your batter on the bottom of the oven rather than in the pan. 

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/4/2014 9:08 AM EST
Posts: 3544
First: 1/16/2009
Last: 4/19/2014
Thanks for the helpful information.

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/4/2014 2:54 PM EST
Posts: 1856
First: 10/8/2010
Last: 2/12/2014
In Response to Re: Spring Foam Pans?:
Before you pour a regular batter into a Springform pan wrap the outside of the pan with aluminum foil.. They have a tendency to leak and you don't want your batter on the bottom of the oven rather than in the pan. 
Posted by nikki p


Nikki it is amazing what we older bakers take for granted to do, forgetting that the younger ones might not have a clue.  Sometimes I set my springform on a cookie sheet.

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/6/2014 9:44 PM EST
Posts: 3406
First: 10/6/2010
Last: 4/15/2014
In Response to Re: Spring Foam Pans?:
In Response to Re: Spring Foam Pans? : Nikki it is amazing what we older bakers take for granted to do, forgetting that the younger ones might not have a clue.  Sometimes I set my springform on a cookie sheet.
Posted by JUDY O

I have been tempted to check into the "new"spring form pan that I have seen that has a silicone ring that prevents leaking.  I think the maker is Kuhn Rikon if I have the spelling correct. But I recently saw an episode of Americas Test Kitchen and not sure if they tested that one or not but they did mention that all they tested did leak. Not a resounding endorsement for any pan!

.....Wait did you say...Older bakers?....humph!

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/7/2014 2:12 PM EST
Posts: 1856
First: 10/8/2010
Last: 2/12/2014
In Response to Re: Spring Foam Pans?:
In Response to Re: Spring Foam Pans? : I have been tempted to check into the "new"spring form pan that I have seen that has a silicone ring that prevents leaking.  I think the maker is Kuhn Rikon if I have the spelling correct. But I recently saw an episode of Americas Test Kitchen and not sure if they tested that one or not but they did mention that all they tested did leak. Not a resounding endorsement for any pan! .....Wait did you say...Older bakers?....humph!
Posted by nikki p


Ok, Nikki.  Senior bakers.

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/7/2014 2:15 PM EST
Posts: 1856
First: 10/8/2010
Last: 2/12/2014
In Response to Spring Foam Pans?:
I am making a staggered cake with three sizes, a 10 in 9 in and 8 in. The only pans I have in these sizes are spring foam. I have had to throw 2 cakes away cause I can't find anywhere that says how much batter in each and how long to cook them for. I cooked the 8 inch for around 45 min and my knife came out clean so I thought it was done, I went to level it and when I took the top off it had a pudding like center. Any tips would be helpful.  Thank you
Posted by rachelle c



rachelle, on second thought, probably why the center wasn't cooked is that the sidesof the spring form pans are too high for the amount of batter you need for a layer.  Regular layer pans aren't nearly as tall.  You might hav to just give up and buy some layer pans.

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/7/2014 3:47 PM EST
Posts: 2166
First: 8/8/2008
Last: 4/19/2014
interesting

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/10/2014 10:52 AM EST
Posts: 6
First: 12/12/2013
Last: 1/10/2014
I got these pans as a wedding gift and I don't make cheesecake so I was just trying to put them to use

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/14/2014 4:13 PM EST
Posts: 3406
First: 10/6/2010
Last: 4/15/2014
In Response to Re: Spring Foam Pans?:
I got these pans as a wedding gift and I don't make cheesecake so I was just trying to put them to use
Posted by rachelle c

I use my Spring form pan for Tarts and Pies.  Cold pies not a hot apple pie or something like that.  I have made French Silk Pie, Truffle Pie, Peanut Butter Pie in my Spring form pan.  The pies and tarts are so much easier to cut when you remove the sides compared to trying to cut when it is in a pie plate. 

Re: Spring Foam Pans?

posted at 1/14/2014 5:13 PM EST
Posts: 1073
First: 11/14/2008
Last: 4/7/2014
Lots of helpful information - thank you!

Forums » Baking Forums » Beginners and Advice » Spring Foam Pans?